Corroboration

Photo from the Camp David Accord.
Photo from the Camp David Accord. Source: www.egyptindependent.com

Corroboration is the ability to compare two or more sources with each other and identify points of agreement. Sources that show the same or similar information are considered to ‘agree’ (corroborate) with each other.

 

When making an argument in your writing, corroboration between sources strengthens your conclusions.

 

When choosing sources to corroborate, pick those that are deemed particularly reliable, which adds further certainty to your claims.


Demonstrating source corroboration in your writing:


Both Crocodile Dundee (1986) and Australia (2008) depict Australians as rugged men that live in the bush.

 

Smith says that “the Spartans’ victory was dependent upon their superior military training” (1981, 31), which is supported by Jones who says that “the Persians could not match the Spartan’s disciplined tactics” (1994, 56-62).

 

Influential anti-imperialist writers Chomsky and Blum say the same thing: violence should not be used by anti-US campaigners (Chomsky, 1998, 34; Blum, 2006, 112).

 

Chomsky and Blum, influential anti-imperialist writers, have both cautioned members of more extremist anti-US movements against violence (Chomsky, 1998, 34; Blum, 2006, 112).